Monday, April 19, 2010

Rosemary Thyme Pork Tenderloin & Grilled Eggplant (With Videos!)


I've decided that the best thing about taking over half of the cooking is that I'm exempt from dish duty more than usual. I hate washing dishes and I hate washing other people's dishes even more. There's just something disgusting about it and I try to avoid it at all cost. I also try to avoid cleaning in general and usually put it off until the state of my apartment or room becomes bothersome or I'm having guests over. This is why I always say that I want a house husband. He can clean and take care of things, minus some of the cooking, and I can blissfully go through life without having to mop a floor or dust a shelf. Or I could get a maid. In the meantime, don't worry about me--I've always kept my kitchen sanitary, minus the pile of dishes, of course.

Today's post is a further introduction to my sous chef, as talked about here. He is affirmatively in charge of the grilling in this house, with some input from me. I think one of the hardest things about learning to cook is dealing with meats. Prepping meat for cooking is not particularly intuitive. Do you or don't you cut off the fat or membrane? If so, how much and where? And how do you even pick out a nice cut? Most other things are easy to figure out--you can slice and dice most things without thought, or taste a sauce or vegetable to see if done. Meat is also more difficult because you're trying to figure out what it looks like in the middle and you need to do so without cutting into it (you don't want to let that juice out). Sure, you could use a thermometer in a roast, but when using a home oven there is a good chance that one part of the middle is more cooked through than the other. Plus, it seems sort of silly to stick a thermometer in something sitting on your barbecue---especially a steak that is only an inch thick.

Because I am learning how to navigate the world of animal flesh and am finding the tidbits my father is sharing helpful, I decided that I would video his advice for all of you. And lucky you, it's just in time for grilling season.

Ingredients
1 pork tenderloin
2 tbsp rosemary (fresh, if you have it)
2 tbsp thyme (fresh, preferably) 
1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil (an additional for eggplant)
kosher salt
pepper
eggplant 

Directions
1. To get it out of the way, for the eggplant, you're going to lightly drizzle or brush olive oil on both sides of each slice, then salt and pepper to liking. I have a pan that goes on the grill, but you can place them on the grate directly.

 

2. Take your tenderloin and prepare it for seasoning. This requires you to trim off the fat and membranes. 


3. Once you've trimmed your tenderloin, it is time to season it. Mince your herbs and mix in the olive oil, a little salt, and a little pepper. Brush it over your meat, covering the entire thing.


4.  Cover the tenderloin with plastic wrap and let sit in your fridge for at least two hours. In the meantime,  prep some side dishes. I also made quinoa, to which I added chopped walnuts and wilted spinach.

5. Turn your barbecue to high, and sear each side for approximately 2 minutes. Then cook for approximately 15 minutes, checking frequently after 10 minutes. This video explains how to do this, as well as how to tell when your meat is done


6. About 5 minutes into cooking, place your eggplant on the other side of the grill, where the heat should be lower. Watch carefully so you can flip them before the burn.


7. Let meat sit for 5 minutes before cutting.

5 comments:

Michael and Natalie said...

I'll help! I know all the answers to all those questions you asked! I know about the membrane. Ask me. I know.

Chef Dennis said...

wow....that pork and eggplant looks really really good!! and thanks so much for those tips on roasting chick peas!! This is all virgin territory for me!

Aunt Lynne said...

Love the video! So yummy. I guess a barbecue is on my wish list. What features should one look for when replacing a 25 year old barbecue that burns on one end and under-cooks on the other? Do you think I should hire your sous chief?

Baking Barrister said...

My sous chef would certainly be the best person to ask about that, as he would be the first person I'd ask.

Leiwei said...

Pork tenderloin with eggplants I have to try since I'm a big lover of all eggplant dishes (second to tofu).

Post a Comment

NOTE: I understand that Blogger is currently having issues with its commenting system. If the comment box or Captcha do not show up, or you experience other problems, please e-mail me with your browser version, whether your Java is up-to-date, and whether you are on a Mac or PC. Please feel free to send your comment my way as well--I appreciate them all and I'm sorry Blogger hates us right now.


Thank you for indulging my narcissistic tendencies and leaving a comment. My ego sincerely appreciates it. As a quick note before you leave me accolades and ask for my hand in marriage, if you need a question answered promptly, you're better off sending an e-mail or a tweet. My computer is all fancy-like and beeps at me when you do.